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Latest Questions - Biomass Power Production

  • http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780444595584

    in Biomass Power Production Biodiesel Algae Fuels Biomass to Liquid Oil and Cleantech Agri Waste Management Plastic Management Anaerobic Digestion of Waste Rainwater Harvesting Organic Textiles Trains and Cleantech Regulations, Policies and Incentives Biotechnology

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  • Dear sir's
    How to calculte the Areal productivity of open air farm and dry wt T/Hac/Year?
    How to calculate the production cost ?

    in Biomass Power Production Biodiesel Algae Fuels Clean Coal Agri Waste Management Water Purification Biotechnology

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  • Hi there, what is the metal ion which have toxic effect on microalgae? or what is the heavy metals that affecting algal growth?

    in Biomass Power Production Algae Fuels

    • Gaya3 4 years ago

      Generally the order of metal toxicity which affects the algal species is Hg> Cu>Cd>Ag>Pb>Zn. Mercury being the most toxic metal affects the enzyme systems of the algae and inhibits their functions. Copper is used to control the algal blooms in fresh water. The extent of toxicity depends on the ionic content or free Cu2+ ions available in the algal culture and not the total copper concentration.

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  • I really want to run some experiments growing algae heterotrophically or maybe mixotrophically. I have heard that cell densities as well as lipid content can get to very high levels. But I am having trouble finding good literature [technical or otherwise] to base experiments from. Could someone please help me out, or at least point me in the right direction

    in Biomass Power Production Biodiesel Algae Fuels Biotechnology

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  • http://www.businessgreen.com/bg/news/2194307/drax-aims-to-go-coalfree-after-biomass-subsidy-review - Drax going for a 100% biomass power plant? Is that what this article means?

    in Biomass Power Production

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  • how can i found information about soap from micro algae or how we can make the soap with microalgae that have good point for body?

    in Biomass Power Production Biobutanol Agri Waste Management Cleantech Education in Schools

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  • Hi guys!

    I've got some spare time during the days and im wondering if someone could give me a tip about what i can do at home to be "green". Talking about energy, cultivations and maybe bulding some sort of self sufficientness in my home. Im open for suggestions!!! and im ready to build! =D

    in Biomass Power Production Algae Fuels Offshore Wind Vertical Axis Wind Turbines Recycling Gardening Sustainable Homes and Communities

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  • We know that there are attempt to produce and better the fuel from algae. Has any one tried to used algae cakes left after extraction for use in the biomass gasifiers to produce energy?...Is it efficient to do this instead of using the algae mass as feed for humans and animals?

    in Biomass Power Production

    • View all 6 answers
    • Donmichael 5 years ago

      The algae meal or cake can be used for just about anything. I'm sure most algae will have a high BTU compared to most kinds of biomass and even lignite coal even after oil extraction, but before you go throwing that stuff into a gasifier you might want to ask yourself if there is other sources of fuel around aside from algae that is less valuable and more available. Since anything from plastic to human solid waste can be gasified, it seems more prudent to use that highly nutritious algae meal for food, pharmaceuticals, vitamins,cosmetics, textiles, fabrics, paper fiber, building materials, bioplastics, alcohols and/or chemicals and just use the algae meal as a back up when needed for the gasifier. I think gasifiers should be used in tandem with algae systems but only to utilize the solid waste that algae cannot consume while feeding soluble waste to the algae including the co2 from the gasifier and toilet water from the house. Burning algae is way better than burning anything else for economic and environmental reasons, but with so many organisms to feed and so much available unneeded waste to burn, its just not economical to do so right now. However, I believe algae is the future and that it will be grown anywhere that there is pollution. So while regular gasification companies benefit from free garbage to burn for some time they will still eventually have to invest in growing algae to burn once all of the garbage is gone.

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  • Most of the renewable energy initiatives have huge capital investment and long gestation time than conventional modes. This effectively shunts away most of people to use these alternative methods.
    Does providing govt subsidy is the only way to make people to use these technologies ?

    Any comments...

    in Biomass Power Production Solar PV Onshore Wind Regulations, Policies and Incentives

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  • Hi there. How many squares should I count in Sedgwick-Rafter chamber and how can I calculate the number of algal cells in 1 ml of sample?

    in Biomass Power Production

    • Jkorstad 5 years ago

      It all depends on how dense your sample is, how accurate you want to be, and what magnification you're using. Most SR cells don't have grid lines, so you must have that in your ocular lens. The best (most accurate) method would be to use an stage micrometer slide (eg http://www.tedpella.com/histo_html/2280-10.htm) and measure the length (and height) of your grid at a set magnification, and then determine how many of those squares "fill" your SR cell, which should be 50mm long x 20mm wide and 1mm deep = 1 ml (http://www.2spi.com/catalog/standards/sedgewick-rafter-counting-cell.shtml) Here's what I share w/ my students: Sample Collection Procedure Attach the 64um plankton net to a pole and holding the net away from the body, to the side, drag the net barely beneath the water’s surface for 100 meters. Take care not to drag the net on the bottom of the lake. Slosh the net up and down in the pond without submersing the mouth of the net in the water, to dislodge all the organisms that may be clinging to the inside of the net. Allow the excess water to drain out of the net. Carefully empty the contents of the collecting bottle into a labeled container. Add preservative to the container upon return to the laboratory.. Analysis Procedure In order to estimate the amount of plankton organisms in a lake, we count the amount in a sample of known volume, and then multiply by the volume of the lake. Stir the bottle of preserved plankton so that the plankton are momentarily uniformly suspended in the lake water. Using a syringe-pipette device, draw out 1 mL and discharge the water into a Sedgewick-Rafter Counting Chamber. Cover with a 22x50 mm cover slip. Before beginning the plankton counts as described below, scan your slide and familiarize yourself with the various types of plankton using the photographs and identification guides. Each class member will take one phytoplankton and one zooplankton count and then give their results to the phytoplankton and zooplankton teams. Phytoplanton count: With the microscope on the 100x magnification, focus on 3 random fields of view. For each view, use the illustrated tally sheet to identify and count the number of phytoplankton in the selected field. For filamentous algae like Spirogyra and Ulothrix, count each cell in the filament as individual cells. For colonies like Dinobryon and Anabaena, count each colony as one individual. Give these 3 counts to the phytoplankton group. Zooplankton count: With the microscope on the 32 or 40x magnification, focus on 3 random fields of view. For each view, use the illustrated tally sheet to identify and count the number of zooplankton in the selected field. Give these 3 counts to the zooplankton group. Calculation of # plankton/ml: Each plankton team will then total the counts for each type of plankton recorded and determine an average number of each type in a field of view. To get numbers per ml, multiply the average value by 431 for phytoplankton (at 100x), by 28 for zooplankton (32x), or by 86 for zooplankton (40x). Hope this helps. Good success, John PS Another useful ref. just now saw: http://www.vic.waterwatch.org.au/file/inform/Biological%20Surveys_Algae.pdf

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