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Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

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Latest Questions - Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

  • Selvas wants to know Biodiesel 4 years ago

    After estrification v r collecting the hexane layer for analysis the FAME for GCMS.. if they any need to evaporate the hexane... if no need to evaporate..what about the hexane content ... pl can u clarify me ?

    in Biodiesel Algae Fuels Biomass to Liquid Emerging Biofuel Feedstock Fuel Cells Transport Fuel Efficiency

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  • I'm looking for a possible and easily available algae feed stock that could in the catalytic pyrolysis which in my final year project. I need help in it.

    in Biodiesel Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

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  • This was what I read about Joule Technologies

    "
    Joule Wins Prestigious Wall Street Journal Technology Innovation Award

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Oct 18, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- Joule today announced its recognition as the 2011 Wall Street Journal Technology Innovation Award Winner in the category of Energy, chosen for its transformational approach to highly-efficient renewable fuel production. In addition, Joule received the Silver award across all of the competition's 16 categories, for which there were over 600 entrants from around the world.

    "We are honored to be the Wall Street Journal's choice for the most innovative energy company, and to be recognized even beyond our industry as one of the world's top innovators overall," said Bill Sims, President and CEO of Joule.

    "We started with a big idea -- the direct conversion of sunlight to fuel without raw material feedstocks -- and four years later we've proven the process, optimized the technology, built a strong patent portfolio and laid the groundwork for commercial production to begin in 2013. We will bring much-needed scalability and infrastructure-readiness to the renewable fuels space, with a platform that can yield multiple products, including valuable, fungible diesel fuel vs. a blendstock like biodiesel. We appreciate this recognition of our company's efforts to successfully innovate outside of today's common 'biofuel' definition," said Sims. "

    Now, what had puzzled me about Joule Technology's concept "the direct conversion of sunlight to fuel without raw material feedstocks"...this appears to be an exaggeration because they are using cyanobacteria as an agent, and as we all know, cyanobacteria is an algae. So, they cant claim they are not using any feedstock...at least this was my idea about what the company did until a few months back...does anyone have any other opinions about Joule?

    It will be great if they have been indeed produced a breakthough, but I am not sure of that

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/joule-wins-prestigious-wall-street-journal-technology-innovation-award-2011-10-18

    in Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

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  • Some really cool and excellent inputs

    1. Waste capture.
    2. Breakthrough in carbon fixation and solar efficiency.
    3. Development of symbiotic communities of enhanced organisms.
    4. Off-the-shelf parts inventory in synthetic biology.
    5. Shift from freshwater to saline water.
    6. Rooftop bio systems.
    7. Super-light, super-strong materials.
    8. Bio-processors built into biomass.

    http://biofuelsdigest.com/bdigest/2011/09/06/eight-bio-based-technologies-for-2050/

    in Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

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  • I read this recently @ CleanTick news - http://www.cleantick.com/portal/news/pages/955

    "
    Aquaflow Bionomic Corporation has signed a deal with the CRI Catalyst Company to produce commercially viable cellulosic hydrocarbon fuels and blends.

    CRI had acquired the Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion technology (IH2) earlier this year. Aquaflow’s algal capability and this technology will be testes and evaluated as a part of the agreement.

    IH2 is an advanced pyrolysis technology which will utilize low pressure hydrogen together with a catalyst to convert biomass cost-effectively into renewable gasoline, diesel and jet hydrocarbon blend stocks."

    So, this is essentially hydrocracking, right, whatever fancy terms that CRI uses for the same thing? And what do you think of such a method? This involves the extensive use of hydrogen, so that could result in significant increase in costs?

    Any intelligence on the suitability (technical and economic feasibility) of hydrocracking / hydroprocessing of biomass (especially algal biomass) will be very interesting

    Thank you

    in Ethanol Biodiesel Algae Fuels Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

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  • in Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

    • Akshaya 6 years ago

      First generation feedstocks includes those that are already widely grown and used for some form of bioenergy or biofuel production. The vast majority of these crops are also used for food and feed production, which means that there are possible food versus fuel conflicts. Sugars, starches from wheat, sorghum, sweet potato, oils and fats from edible oil plants and waste animal fat are some of the examples. Second generation feedstocks are crops that have high potential yields of biofuels, but that are not widely cultivated, or not cultivated as an energy crop. It is sometimes used to refer to convential crops, like mustard that are considered to have strong biofuels potential. Most commonly, it refers to cellulosic feedstocks. Third-generation biofuels seek to improve yields through improving the feedstocks themselves instead of the processes. Third generation or advanced feedstocks include those sources that promise to generate greater than 500 gallons of oil per acre per year, examples- palm oil and algae oil, rapseed and Jatropha oil, Grasses (switchgrass, miscanthus), trees (willow), halophytes (saltwater plants).

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  • Company : Powerplant CCS

    in Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

    • Nivethitha 6 years ago

      Biomass which can be harvested only in wet conditions and cannot be dried directly in the field can be upgraded as a fuelstock through the technique of ensiling. After the reduction of water content in the ensiled biomass by mechanical pressing, the biomass can be used as fuel for thermal power generation. Water reduction by mechanical pressing processes ensiled biomass into fuel feedstock with a minimum dry matter content of 60 per cent

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  • Company : Biozio

    in Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

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  • The major drawback in using switchgrass for commercial scale production of ethanol is the plants succeptiblity to pests, fungus and weather conditions. Are there any ways to improve the recalcitrance of Switchgrass?

    in Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

    • View all 2 answers
    • Rajshekar 6 years ago

      You were spot on. There is no need to improve recalcitrance. In fact, decreasing it would help. And that is what the scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have done. They have adopted the transgenic approach and genetically manipulated lignin to reduce recalcitrance and improve ethanol production from switchgrass. They have been successful in decreasing the lignin content to one eighth of normal levels by down regulating the expression of caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase which plays a key role in lignin biosynthesis. Even after reducing lignin content to such a level, the plant showed good recalcitrance that was enough to survive against pests, fungus and adverse weather conditions.

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  • in Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

    • Sindhujar 6 years ago

      Yes, very true. Researchers from the Department of Plant Science in California have developed that equation for estimating Arundo donax shoot dry weight from shoot length. The equation, shoot dry weight (g) = 14.254 x shoot height^2 (m), The researchers found that the equation provided accurate estimates of dry weight for shoots ranging from 0.3 to 7.06 m height .The equation provides above ground biomass estimates from stem counts and heights more rapidly than harvest methods. Regarding your second question, I have no clue if this can be replicated for other crops.

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