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Latest Questions - Ethanol

  • There are a few manufacturers on the internet that make PBRs. I've even seen a few talks about it on this site and Oilgae. Does anyone have plans to make a small home version, costing less than $1000 USD? I don't care if most of the functions must be done manually. I just want a cheap version, to run some experiments.

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  • i guess the two most important polysaccharides derived from red algae are agar and carrageenan, usually are there how many percent agar and carrageenan present in red algae particylarly gracilaria? thank you

    in Ethanol Algae Fuels

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  • production of ethanol from algae

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    • View all 7 answers
    • Mohsinbbt 6 years ago

      hi i m student of biotechlogy. ( BS ) . please give me some ideas about the projects . i want to do some projects which will be help ful in future as our uni is just focussing on theories

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  • ethanol from casava,as we know..casava have growth very long time and needed wide area for farming,and I interest about algae,how to make ethanol from algae

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  • I read this recently @ CleanTick news - http://www.cleantick.com/portal/news/pages/955

    "
    Aquaflow Bionomic Corporation has signed a deal with the CRI Catalyst Company to produce commercially viable cellulosic hydrocarbon fuels and blends.

    CRI had acquired the Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion technology (IH2) earlier this year. Aquaflow’s algal capability and this technology will be testes and evaluated as a part of the agreement.

    IH2 is an advanced pyrolysis technology which will utilize low pressure hydrogen together with a catalyst to convert biomass cost-effectively into renewable gasoline, diesel and jet hydrocarbon blend stocks."

    So, this is essentially hydrocracking, right, whatever fancy terms that CRI uses for the same thing? And what do you think of such a method? This involves the extensive use of hydrogen, so that could result in significant increase in costs?

    Any intelligence on the suitability (technical and economic feasibility) of hydrocracking / hydroprocessing of biomass (especially algal biomass) will be very interesting

    Thank you

    in Ethanol Biodiesel Algae Fuels Emerging Biofuel Feedstock

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Latest Discussions - Ethanol

  • Alternative fuels: Difference engine: Meet the meth drinkers | The Economist - http://www.economist.com/blogs/babbage/2012/03/alternative-fuels

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  • A fledgling IIT-Madras incubated start-up, Sea6Energy, has signed a deal with the Danish company Novozymes, one of the world’s largest industrial biotech companies, to jointly develop a process for producing biofuels from seaweeds.

    A routine thing in the West you’d say, where large companies tap the start-up innovation pool, but it’s still a rare event in India. The alliance, where each brings its own funds, will use enzymes to convert seaweed-based carbohydrates to sugar, which is then fermented to produce ethanol for fuel, fine chemicals, proteins for food, and fertilizers for plants.

    Novozymes’ India arm will look for new enzymes, develop, and manufacture them for the conversion; Sea6Energy, which has so far developed an offshore seaweed farming system (based on marine plastics polymer), will continue to develop its cultivation technology.


    http://forbesindia.com/blog/technology/bold-and-beautiful-turning-seaweed-into-biofuels/

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  • About seven million tonnes of grain corn was grown in Ontario in 2011, and by year’s end roughly 30 per cent of that is expected to go toward ethanol fuel production.

    Let’s ignore for the moment the whole food-versus-fuel debate, and assume that devoting nearly a third of Ontario corn production to making renewable fuel doesn’t help drive up global food prices, or for that matter, reduce our capacity to feed the world.

    Let’s focus instead on the use of corn as part of a greenhouse-gas reduction strategy that returns more economic value per harvested bushel. Through this lens, is biofuel production the best use of a renewable but also land-limited resource?

    Corn, after all, doesn’t have to be made into ethanol and burned in the gas tanks of our cars to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels. It can also be used to make a variety of “green” chemicals that form the basis of a wide variety of products currently made from petroleum-based chemicals.

    Does it make sense to just burn this material for energy, or convert it into fuel so it can be burned? Or, should we be doing a better job of targeting niche markets with high-value “green” products that are just as effective at reducing our dependence on fossil fuels?

    http://oilprice.com/Alternative-Energy/Biofuels/Are-Biofuels-the-Best-Use-of-Our-Limited-Land-Resources.html

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    • Reinhardttorres 5 years ago

      Besides than algae oil production is too superior to vegetable oil crops, space area of algae cultures can be drastically reducing if open pound cultures are replaced by continuos or semicontinuos closed production systems; such as closed PBRs.

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  • SOURCE: http://www.grist.org/list/2011-10-03-the-future-of-fuel-from-trash-infographic 

    in Ethanol Biodiesel Biomass to Liquid

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  • Green slime is growing in ponds next to an ethanol plant here, and Todd Becker intends to turn it into green money.

    Becker, CEO of the fourth-largest U.S. ethanol company, has entered an unusual joint venture that is part of a nationwide push to grow algae for biofuel.

    In covered ponds on the edge of this small Iowa town, the fast-growing, oil-rich microorganisms feed on carbon dioxide that formerly went out the ethanol plant's smokestack.

    But while the dream of the nation's emerging algae industry is to make fuel, Becker and his partners see a different way to make profits immediately -- in fish food and dietary supplements.

    "Some people say algae is ... years away from being profitable," said Becker, CEO of Omaha-based Green Plains Renewable Energy. "We say 10 months."

    The algae industry, whose trade group meets this week in Minneapolis, has long set its sights on developing a new generation of biofuels. The challenge has been making it at a competitive price, which some experts say could be years away.

    So Green Plains and some other companies are exploring other markets.

    In August, the company and a partner, BioProcess Algae, based in Portsmouth, R.I., installed commercial-scale algae-growing technology at Green Plains' Shenandoah ethanol plant. The companies plan to expand the operation and begin selling algae next spring.

    "We initially got into this thinking the fuel markets were where we want to go," Becker said in an interview at the Shenandoah plant. "We were going to make the algae, get the oil out of the algae and make fuel out of it."

    But Becker said the profits are in algae-based feeds for fish farms and livestock and algae-derived Omega-3 fatty acids for food and dietary supplements. The venture's algae last week passed a key test for poultry feed, and Becker said customers will be in place when commercial production begins next year.

    In two to three years, Becker said, Green Plains hopes to be running BioProcess Algae's "Grower Harvester" technology at all nine of its ethanol plants, including its northernmost one in Fergus Falls, Minn. The greenhouse-based system relies on sunlight, continuously harvested ponds and brush-like filaments on which algae grow. The farms are expected to operate in all but the coldest months.

    Reaching commercial scale

    The algae industry, after decades of research, is pushing toward commercialization across the United States.

    Large ventures in California, Florida, Hawaii and New Mexico have attracted investors like Exxon Mobil and the venture fund of Microsoft founder Bill Gates.

    Sapphire Energy Inc., a four-year-old company based in San Diego, this month broke ground on a $135 million algae-for-fuel project in New Mexico to grow algae in vast outdoor ponds. Federal agencies awarded it a $50 million grant and a $54.5 million loan guarantee.

    The industry also has many smaller players like Algaedyne Corp., a start-up in Preston, Minn., that has tested a technology to grow algae from farm animal waste. CEO Thomas Byrne said algae technology needs to move beyond academic labs into commercial production.

    "You need to get it into the hands of what I call the tech guys who are working on it with their hands at a commercial scale on a day-to-day basis," said Byrne, who also has been a financial consultant to the ethanol industry. "If it stays in the lab it is going to be another 20 years. If you get it out and get it commercial-size, the guys working on it are going to figure out how to do it cheaper."

    Mary Rosenthal, executive director of the St. Paul-based Algal Biomass Organization, an industry trade group, said algae has long been produced for things like dietary supplements. The new push for biofuels and other products should bring them to market in late 2015 and 2016, she said.

    Faster pace in Iowa

    In Iowa, the strategy of Green Plains and BioProcess Algae is to make money at each step up in production.

    Tim Burns, CEO of BioProcess Algae, said the company got into the algae business in 2005-2006 by adapting filtration technology developed by another company he co-founded, BioProcess H2O. It manufactures filaments to help grow waste-filtering bacteria. Algae also like to grow on the filaments, Burns said.

    The Iowa joint venture into algae was launched in 2008. Green Plains offered a source of carbon dioxide along with expertise in selling animal feed. The company annually produces and markets 2.5 million tons of dried distiller's grains, which are a byproduct of ethanol production.

    Small-scale pilot algae-growing technology was installed at the Iowa plant in 2009, followed by larger, demonstration-scale units called Grower Harvesters last year. In August, two greenhouses were fitted with commercial-scale equipment in ponds. That technology will be replicated on five acres next spring, followed immediately by another 200 acres and eventually up to 400 acres of ponds, Burns said.
    - read more http://www.startribune.com/business/132331463.html

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  • A newly formed group -- the Coalition for E85 -- is battling an E85 price increase at the end of the year, when the Volumetric Ethanol Excise Tax Credit is likely to expire. In its place, the coalition is lobbying for a 50 cent per gallon tax credit. - http://ethanolproducer.com/articles/8212/coalition-e85-should-be-eligible-for-alternative-fuel-tax-credit

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  • Single, Key Gene Discovery Could Streamline Production of Biofuels - Researchers from the Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) have identified THE GENE which controls the production of ethanol in microbes. This discovery could be the missing link in developing biomass crops that produce higher concentrations of ethanol at lower costs - http://energy.gov/articles/single-key-gene-discovery-could-streamline-production-biofuels

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  • Andersens adding cheaper wheat to corn biomass in its ethanol

    Andersons, one of the U.S.' major players on the ethanol production scene, has started mixing cheaper soft red winter wheat into its corn-based biofuel. This move, according to Andersons, will drive down costs and lessen demand for corn. Andersons says the soft red winter wheat harvest is peaking, so the stuff is available in mass quantities. It's estimated that Andersons is currently mixing ten percent wheat in with corn.

    http://green.autoblog.com/2011/07/12/andersens-adding-cheaper-wheat-corn-ethanol/

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  • Patented Cellulosic Ethanol Microbe

    Qteros, Inc., a Biotech firm and University of Massacheusetts Amherst have successfully patented cellulosic ethanol microbe named as Q microbe. The Q Microbe is a naturally occurring "biorefinery" that produces virtually all enzymes required for biomass degradation into pentose and hexose sugars, while simultaneously co-fermenting all these sugars into ethanol as its natural metabolic end product.

    By patenting this microbe they have achieved two significant intellectual property advantage. The first intellectual property protection for genomic development and the use of gene combinations in Q microbe and other microorganisms to enhance an organism's innate ability to hydrolyze biomass and improve the efficiency and yield of ethanol produced by an organism.

    In a second but related advance, the Japanese Patent and Trademark Office allowed a patent titled, "Systems and Methods for Producing Biofuels and Related Materials."

    Both patents are based on the discovery of Clostridium phytofermentans by microbiologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Qteros is the exclusive licensee of the patent.

    Qteros is funded by leading investors in the alternative energy industry including, among others, Venrock Associates, Battery Ventures, BP AE Ventures, Soros Fund Management LLC, and Valero Energy Corporation.

    Read the complete article @

    http://bitly.com/oAeuMH

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  • Uncertainty about Cellulosic Ethanol in USA

    With increasing demand for ethanol, Dupoint is set to build a cellulosic power plant near Nevada. This is good news to the cellulosic ethanol industry. Uncertainty clouds the cellulosic ethanol's contribution as the U.S EPA has reduced the expectation on biofuels to 6.5 million gallons for 2011 and in the following year to 12.9 million gallons. With EPA reducing the cellulosic ethanol target for the third consecutive time, the question arises if the other renewable fuels from non-corn ethanol to reach the target of 36 billion gallons by 2025.

    Read the complete story @

    http://bitly.com/oC07OC

    Also visit http://bitly.com/mZ2kKB to know more on cellulosic ethanol.

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  • An Introduction to Cellulosic Ethanol species

    Ethanol produced from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin part of the plants is called cellulosic ethanol. Many sources have been identified for extracting ethanol. Most common sources known to us are corn stover, switch grass (Panicum virgatum), Miscanthus spp. and other species like Arundo donax, soybean, Chinese tallow tree, camelina sativa...

    To know more about all the species that are used for cellulosic ethanol production goto

    http://bitly.com/oVrEgP

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  • Ethanol’s “net return on energy invested” (NROEI) triples due to production efficiencies - Nebraska Center for Energy said recent studies conducted conclude that the energy balance, and net return on energy invested, for ethanol is much higher than previously thought, up to three times better. The study found that 1.5-1.6 more units of energy are derived from ethanol than are used to produce it. The increase in yields of ethanol from corn, increase in corn yields, and the reduction in the energy intensity of the ethanol production process, is responsible for the change. - http://biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2008/09/24/ethanols-net-return-on-energy-invested-triples-say-resear

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  • Ethanol’s “net return on energy invested” (NROEI) triples due to production efficiencies - Nebraska Center for Energy said recent studies conducted conclude that the energy balance, and net return on energy invested, for ethanol is much higher than previously thought, up to three times better. The study found that 1.5-1.6 more units of energy are derived from ethanol than are used to produce it. The increase in yields of ethanol from corn, increase in corn yields, and the reduction in the energy intensity of the ethanol production process, is responsible for the change. - http://biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2008/09/24/ethanols-net-return-on-energy-invested-triples-say-resear

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  • Bunge, Itochu in Brazilian Ethanol Investment - In Brazil, Bunge and Japanese trading firm Itochu annoucned that they will invest $800 million in a pair of Brazilian ethanol and sugar mill operations. Itochu said that it will take a 20 percent stake in the Santa Juliana plant in Minas Gerais acquired originally by Bunge in 2007, and the two companies will construct a second sugar mill with undisclosed capacity. The Santa Juliana plant capacity will be expanded to 4.2 million tonnes of cane, from 1.6 million today. - http://biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2008/09/24/bunge-itochu-announce-800-million-investment-in-brazilian

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  • India’s First Demonstration-Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Biorefinery Set to Open - Demonstration-scale projects are popping up with greater frequency. The latest such project to come onto the radar is one being built in the Indian state of Karnataka. Developed by Godavari Sugar Mills Ltd in Sameerwadi, Karnataka, the biorefinery will use sugarcane bagasse (the fiber which is left over after the juice has been pressed out) to produce ethanol. - http://www.treehugger.com/files/2008/09/india-first-demonstration-scale-cellulosic-ethanol-biorefine

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  • Ceres, a proponent of grasses - Ceres, based in Thousand Oaks, CA is a leading proponent of grasses for biofuels. The species it has chosen to examine - switchgrass, miscanthus, sugarcane and sorghum - are so-called C-4 grasses. These are the favs of the biofuels industry because they share an efficient form of photosynthesis that enables them to grow fast -

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  • Cow belches, not farts, emit methane - Cows produce methane as a result of enteric fermentation by symbiotic bacteria living in their digestive systems. But most enteric fermentation occurs in cow stomachs, not intestines, so most methane emitted by a cow - up to 98% according to one scientist - is through belching, not farting. - http://envirovore.com/content/view/279/9/

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  • Nigerian cassava growers say ethanol investment gives 13 % return for farmers, 83 % for communities - Nigerian Cassava Growers Association said that Nigeria will save over $6.1 billion by 2012 on the importation of kerosene and gasoline. - http://biofuelsdigest.com/blog2/2008/09/24/ethanols-net-return-on-energy-invested-triples-say-resear

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  • Coskata's Process for Ethanol is much better? - Coskata uses a three-stage hybrid biothermal process (gasification plus fermentation). Depending on the feedstock and with the cogeneration of bioelectricity or steam export, the Coskata process can result in up to a 96% reduction of CO2 in the production of the fuel and is up to 7.7 times more energy positive compared to conventional gasoline, according to an evaluation by Argonne National Laboratory. Coskata’s three-step syngas-to-ethanol continuous process uses: - http://www.greencarcongress.com/2008/05/gm-pushes-for-e.html

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