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Jatropha Biodiesel

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Latest Questions - Jatropha Biodiesel

  • Does anyone know any other "cleantech" sites that pick up news on the innovation front, news on science behind algae or other sources with information i can take a look on? Feels like cleantech is a bit dead for a 18 year old dude like myself =)

    in Biodiesel Algae Fuels Jatropha Biodiesel Biomass to Liquid Oil and Cleantech Global Warming and Climate Change Sewage Waste Management Agri Waste Management Recycling Gardening Sustainable Homes and Communities Biopolymers and Bioplastics Cleantech Education in Colleges

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    • Narsi 4 years ago

      We have a section at CleanTick called CleanTick Feeds, where we automatically get blog post feeds from over 100 popular cleantech blogs http://www.cleantick.com/feeds Many of the blogs here could be of use to you, not to mention the aggregated feeds themselves

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    • Narsi 5 years ago

      2000 liters per acre? Jatropha gives perhaps 500 liters per acre per year right now, though its potential is supposed to be somewhere around 1000 liters per acre. The estimated yields for jatropha after 5 years under optimal conditions are about 5 T per hectare per year = 2 T per acre per year. At 35% oil content, that would be 0.7 T of oil per acre per year = about 800 liters... Answering your question (which taken on an even higher importance if my estimates are correct), I strongly feel that yields can be increased only after intensive R&D that comprises: 1. Understanding the plant much better and its requirements (water, fertilizers, pesticides...)along its entire cultivation life cycle 2. Working on better clones and hybrids (well, perhaps GM as well, though I personally am against GM) Realistically, I would estimate it would take another 4-5 years for Jatropha to start yielding much higher oil on a sustainable basis, and that too, only if R&D were done in a rigorous way instead of the way it is currently being done by fly-by-night operators.

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  • Environmentally inflicted stresses especially that of drought limit the plant productivity of Jatropha, especially given the fact that it is a plant suited for arid and semi arid conditions. What are the ways to improve the abiotic stress tolerance of Jatropha?

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    • Bharathiramani 6 years ago

      Hybridization with land races or wild types Selection of short duration varieties Lines with higher accumulation of compatible osmolytes Deep rooted cultivars

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    • Nivethitha 6 years ago

      Biodiesel displaces greenhouse intensive diesel produced from refined fossil fuel based crude oil. The extent of the greenhouse benefits depends on a range of factors including the prior use of the land upon which the feedstock (J. curcus) is cultivated; any displacement activities; the use of inputs such as fertiliser and chemicals; the use of agriculture and process machinery; and would also comprise of transportation and distribution. Usually Jatropha enterprenuers, in an attempt to generate saleable carbon credits from their projects, incorporate environmental friendly practices which would result in minimal green house emmisions.

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  • in Jatropha Biodiesel

    • Vaish 6 years ago

      Curcinoleic acid is a hydroxypalmitoleic acid with an unknown position of the hydroxy group. Similar to the castor derived ricinoleic acid, this fatty acid also contains double bonds at similar position. It is a clear, viscous and odourless oil which is used in as a hair conditioner and as an ingredient in skincare cosmetics as well as a rich emollient oil. However, there is not much research interest for this Jatropha derived oil and one can't compare it with the versatile ricnoleic acid from castor

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  • in Jatropha Biodiesel

    • Rajshekar 6 years ago

      The most successful cultivation is done by having a planting density of 2 x 6 meters with a lot of intercropping in the first year. After one year the branch cuttings from one year old plants are planted in the field. So now the planting density goes from 2 x 6 meters to 2 x 4 meters. This renders all the plants in the same age. . The density of intercropped plant is then reduced, but is not eliminated completely at this stage.

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    • Wiley 6 years ago

      A simple and cheap way of increasing jatropha yields is by the use of mycorrhiza, which are fungi that live in symbiosis with plant roots. Mycorrhiza taps organic substances from the plant, especially sugars and B%u2010vitamins. In return mycorrhiza makes nutrients in the soil available for the plant and help in water uptake. Mycorrhiza, combined with moderate fertilization, guarantees a high nutrient uptake by the plant and minimizes nutrients losses by percolation, and are especially effective in poor and dry soils where they can increase yields by about 30%

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    • Badri 6 years ago

      Alterations in the position and number of double bonds, variation in fatty acid chain length, and the introduction of desired functional groups could improve the energy content of Jatropha oil. These kind of efforts have already been established in other oil crops and it is possible that the same may be applied to Jatropha to improve their physico-chemical properties and to make them more suitable for biodiesel production.

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    • Nivethitha 6 years ago

      Yes, it is certainly possible to induce rapid proliferation of explants by use of right combination of phytohormones. The use of BA and IBA will result in direct adventitious shoot bud induction from hypocotyls, leaf explants and petioles. BAP, IAA , glutamine promotes high frequency of multiple shoot proliferation from shoot tip explants Shoot bud proliferation from nodal explants is very high if supplemented with kinetin, BA and TDZ

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    • Wiley 6 years ago

      Reproduction of results and translation of lab scale success to field, is the greatest drawback associated with transformation studies of Jatropha curcas. Though transgenic plants have been regenerated from cotyledonary leaf explants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation with the herbicide phosphinothricin as a selective agent, it was inefficient and difficult to reproduce. Transformation attempts with antibiotic kanamycin and hygromycin selection have produced transgenic calli, but failed to obtain regenerated transgenic plants of J. curcas.

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