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Latest Questions - Sewage Waste Management

  • Does anyone know any other "cleantech" sites that pick up news on the innovation front, news on science behind algae or other sources with information i can take a look on? Feels like cleantech is a bit dead for a 18 year old dude like myself =)

    in Biodiesel Algae Fuels Jatropha Biodiesel Biomass to Liquid Oil and Cleantech Global Warming and Climate Change Sewage Waste Management Agri Waste Management Recycling Gardening Sustainable Homes and Communities Biopolymers and Bioplastics Cleantech Education in Colleges

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    • Narsi 1 year ago

      We have a section at CleanTick called CleanTick Feeds, where we automatically get blog post feeds from over 100 popular cleantech blogs http://www.cleantick.com/feeds Many of the blogs here could be of use to you, not to mention the aggregated feeds themselves

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  • Came across a story that there is a new technology for sewage water management industry in Netherlands

    "The strength of the Nereda technology lies in special bacteria that grow in concentrated and fast settling granules. Conventional methods of treating wastewater use bacteria in fluffy flakes, which take much more time to separate from the treated water."

    Source: http://www.waterworld.com/index/display/article-display/7802776492/articles/waterworld/world-regions/europe/2011/12/Netherlands-sewage-treatment-plant.html

    Well, the idea is clear, but is it possible for some bacteria to leave the organic clumps in the form of concentrated granules while most bacteria make them into fluffy flakes?

    in Sewage Waste Management

    • Kyzyl 2 years ago

      "...Although the Duluth facility uses some of the most advanced technology for cleaning wastewater -- so-called tertiary treatment -- the study identified it as an important source of antibiotic resistance genes. Sampling of water at 13 locations detected three genes, for instance, that make bacteria resistant to the tetracycline group of antibiotics, which are used to treat conditions ranging from acne to sexually transmitted diseases to anthrax and bubonic plague. LaPara's team says their research demonstrates that even the most high-tech sewage treatment plants may be significant sources of antibiotic resistance genes in waterways.The Duluth sewage treatment plant study appears in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. The authors acknowledge funding from the National Science Foundation and the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund. The American Chemical Society is a non-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With more than 163,000 members, ACS is the world's largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio." [http://www.waterworld.com/index/display/article-display/6551521175/articles/waterworld/wastewater/treatment/2011/12/Sewage-treatment-plants-may-contribute-to-antibiotic-resistance.html "Sewage treatment plants may contribute to antibiotic resistance problem"].

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  • Can I use antibiotic when I culture chlorella in wastewater? what is the antibiotic concentration?

    in Sewage Waste Management Agri Waste Management

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  • A treatment for human excrement used in post-earthquake Christchurch is to be taught here.

    Whangarei resident James Bellamy has twice travelled to Christchurch to teach earthquake-struck residents how to build and use composting toilets.

    With much of the city's sewerage and water pipes damaged by the quakes, the composting toilets are a suitable alternative as they do not need water, can be used indoors, do not smell and create no pollution, he says.

    http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/northland/whangarei-leader/5446780/Composting-toilets-on-agenda

    in Sewage Waste Management

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  • in Sewage Waste Management

    • Akshaya 3 years ago

      Sanitary sewer overflow (SSO) is a condition whereby untreated sewage is discharged into the environment prior to reaching treatment facilities thereby escaping wastewater treatment. Human health impacts caused by this include significant numbers of gastrointestinal illness each year, although death from one overflow event is uncommon. Ecological consequences include fish kills, harm to plankton and other aquatic microflora and microfauna. Turbidity increase and dissolved oxygen decrease in receiving waters can lead to accentuated effects beyond the obvious pathogenic induced damage to aquatic ecosystems. Treating the waste water before discharging it underground is one way around it.

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  • in Sewage Waste Management

    • Srividhya 3 years ago

      Constructed wetlands simulate natural wastewater treatment systems, using flow beds to support water-loving plants. The roots of these plants help provide an aerobic environment to aggressively break down contaminants. Constructed wetlands can offer an affordable solution to wastewater for sites with some of the following characteristics: warm climate, failed conventional absorption field, narrow or oddly-shaped lot, high water table, low soil percolation, high organic matter/suspended solids in wastewater and enough unshaded area.

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