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Solar Water Heating And Drying

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Latest Questions - Solar Water Heating And Drying

  • Which are the industrial processes for which solar thermal can be used as a source of heating or drying?

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  • What is the maximum temperature that can be achieved by solar water heaters? I heard it was not more than 70 degrees. Is that correct?

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    • Thudpucker 5 years ago

      I had a plan to heat water using mirrors, reflecting to a Steel ball. Water would cycle though the steel ball. Cold water in as the hot water went out. Someone told me the water in the steel ball might get up to 1000 Degrees F. Way too hot for plastic pipes. But it might make a good Still! Water in those "Roof Boxes" hardly gets as warm as the sunlight on the box. Maybe as much as 85 Degrees F. It's expensive to make a tank or a series of pipes to hold that water at it's warm temp too. You need a lot of insulation around your storage pipes or tank. What about the winter? The temp drops below freezing for 20 to 300 hours, with only a bit of sunlight for 12 hours every day for warming. Water does not freeze hard around here till the temps have been in the 20's F for several hours. I know that's hard to figure out. But before we'd put all that money into Pipe's and mirrors we'd want to know it wont freeze and bust in the winter.

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Latest Discussions - Solar Water Heating And Drying

  • The Monarch Lotus has been designed to look like a lotus flower. It is meant to capture the solar energy and aid in generating electricity, providing hot water to small hotels or homes. The lotus is capable of generating 2KW , sufficient for an average household. http://www.monarch-power.com/blog/2012/02/28/introducing-the-monarch-lotus/

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  • RECYCLED ALGAE DRYING METHODThis model I made uses old pop cans painted black to dry algae. Filtered algae sludge is fills the pop cans. The pop cans then sit out in the sun for 3 hours, evaporating out the water in the algae to an 8%water content. The dry meal can be used for composters, fertilizer and diesel fuel production. (Every dry kilogram of algae has sequestered 2.2 kilograms of CO2)

    in Biodiesel Algae Fuels Biomass to Liquid Solar Water Heating and Drying CO2 Sequestration Biotechnology

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    • Donmichael 5 years ago

      Josh, great job! I'm sure there is a way to make a product with this concept but I'm concerned about the time it takes to fill up the cans. At the very least this is probably the most economical method of drying I've seen done on a small scale for individual use. Do you have plans for scaling up as a waste processor from continuous production? That way you would have a continuous waste of sludge. How long did it take to get all that sludge and what is the ratio of sludge to your primary deisel production in the same amount of time? @Woolncathairs, after the algae is dried, the oil is pressed out with a screw press, and the rest is then heated out. Or... Flash pyrolysis is an energy intensive method that converts algae paste directly into bio crude which then is converted into b100 diesel through transesterfication then is cleaned if needed. Transesterfication is the most used method after pressing as well. However, the best way to get oil out of algae is through live extraction or "milking" which basically sucks the oil out of the algae without harming them. The oil then floats to the top which can then be extracted and processed, and the harvested algae sinks to the bottom where it can be taken back into the bioreactor to regrow more oil. This is way more efficient than batch processing which kills the algae. Batch processing may be good for some applications let's say if you want to extract proteins, carbohydrates and fats for multiple uses; but this is energy intensive because you have to dry the algae to get the products out which also requires various separation methods. To avoid the cost of separation and processing with batch harvesting, it is a good method to produce a high BTU biomass to burn for steam power in a coal plant (the waste heat from the plant can be used to dry the algae) but not for applications that target one needed product like oil. This is also due to the fact that a batch of algae killed requires a batch of algae born, and regrowing new fat cells is way less energy intensive than growing a whole new body. Compare it to telling a fat person to go get fat again after lyposuction; to killing a fat person and telling his friends to have a bunch of kids to grow up and replace him. If you're going to do any research at all it should be on milking oils, carbs, and proteins for specific applications at their point of use to minimize transportation cost. That is one way to undercut fossil fuel prices because fossil fuels cannot be cultivated anywhere and therefore require a large transportation infrastructure. Also, in regards to the drying method. Once you press out the oils the rest is fermented to get alcohol out of the sugars while the protein is used as feedstock and the waste from fermentation is used for fertilizers. There is a wide range of uses for that waste though instead of just fertilzers, like recycling it back into the system as algae fertilizer or used for processing, for better energy conversion.

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  • Google cans solar energy project:Even when you have all the money of Google, you should spend it wisely. The search giant, which invests heavily in renewable energy initiatives, backed off of at least one of them yesterday.


    Google said it is dropping development of “solar thermal” electricity because solar thermal cannot keep pace with the rapid price decline of another solar technology – photovoltaics. The solar thermal cut came as part of Google’s decision to axe its 4-year old Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal initiative, although other renewable programs remained intact.


    “The installed cost of solar photovoltaic technology has declined dramatically over the past few years, making solar photovoltaic technology a compelling choice for consumers,” Google Fellow and senior vice president of operations Urs Hölzle said in a blog post.


    Photovoltaics use solar cells embedded in panels to directly generate electricity. Solar thermal uses mirrors to focus sunlight on a fluid that heats up, creates steam and drives a turbine. It’s also known as “concentrating solar power” (CSP).


    Google’s investments in solar thermal have included $168 million in a giant solar farm that Brightsource Energy Inc. is building Ivanpah, Calif., and a $10 million infusion in Burbank, Calif.-based eSolar.


    Solar thermal makes a spectacular picture, especially the sort that reflects sunlight up to a tower (some solar thermal plants reflect the light onto pipes that run past parabolic mirrors). But several energy companies have started to back off the technology in favor of photovoltaics, such as at California’s huge Blythe installation. The chairman of Spanish utility giant Iberdrola recently blasted solar thermal as senseless.


    Still, other companies are standing by it, noting that it makes sense under certain conditions. It is the centerpiece technology in the Desertec Industrial Initiative’s overarching long term scheme to provide 15 percent of Europe’s electricity from solar farms scattered across N. Africa and the Middle East.


    Construction is set to begin on the first of Desertec’s solar thermal plants next year in Morocco, with a $297 million loan from the World Bank.


    A third approach to solar, called concentrated photovoltaics (CPV), borrows from both PV and solar thermal, in that it magnifies sunlight onto solar cells.


    In canning its solar thermal work, Google is reigning in what some critics have argued was a push too far afield of its core business of Internet search and advertising. As SmartPlanet’s Larry Dignan wrote when Google launched Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal in 2007, “Unless Google is putting ads on windmills it looks like a detour that could make shareholders squirm.”

    Google has freely published results of its research in the solar thermal on the web.


    Google’s now defunct Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal (RE

    in Solar PV Solar Thermal Solar CSP Solar Water Heating and Drying

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